Criminal Act Essays


Juvenile Delinquency Essay

Introduction In the past, there was no such term as “juvenile delinquent” or “juvenile delinquency” within the justice system. As frightening as it is to consider, over a hundred years ago, children who committed crimes were thrown into prisons with adults and some children were even sentenced to corporal punishment or even death (Yale.edu, 2000). Reformers of the justice system were the ones who pushed for a distinct court system for the treatment of juveniles, with the underlying notion being that these young people could potentially be helped and reformed. “Central to the concept of juvenile court was the principle Continue Reading...

Court Process, Judicial Process, and Constitutional Issues

implies that the offender should obtain punishment that is equivalent to his/her criminal act and behavior. Secondly, victims are sometimes given the right to express their feelings and experiences during sentencing. When presenting these feelings and experiences, victims describe the harm they have suffered and the impact of the crime. Victims can share these feelings and experiences either orally or in writing without directly responding to questions from lawyers. After sentencing, the prosecution or defense has the right to appeal, which is usually done to a higher court in the same system. The prosecution can appeal when an immediate… Continue Reading...

Second Chance Act Of 2008

refers to an ability of an individual relapsing into criminal behavior. Typically, the recidivism has been measured by a criminal act, which led to reconviction, re-arrest, or return to prison. According to data released by the National Institution of Justice (2015), approximately 67.8%, which is about two-third of the released prisoners are rearrested within three years of their released. Within five years, 76.6%, three- quarter of the released prisoners are rearrested. Moreover, property offenders and those sentenced for drug crimes are in the top lists of the released prisoners likely to be rearrested. The SCA (Second Chance Act) is… Continue Reading...

Enron Fraud

you never will. Conclusion The key to Enron is understanding that it was a criminal act, not an ethical lapse. This was a concerted, planned fraud. These were not people faced with an ethical dilemma, either in the philosophical sense or even in the sense of trade-offs that Milton Friedman envisioned. The key to Enron was actually that the safeguards that are normally in place to prevent people from getting away with crimes like this broke down for several years. Arthur Andersen did not rotate its auditors, so the same person was able to contribute to the fraud on the auditing… Continue Reading...