U.s. Constitution Essays


Freedom and Bondage Essay

Essay Prompt: Freedom and bondage are two concurrent Themes that run throughout the period of history. In the reform movement that arose in the 19th century those two themes coexisted side by side. how can this be ? And, in what ways was the language of freedom used to subvert and undermine the hard cold facts of slavery and bondage in the United States? Look at the cases of African American and women in comparison to white men in the United States. The two items, freedom and bondage, existed side-by-side in the 19th century. How so? Harvard professor and history Continue Reading...

Guns in the Workplace

In my personal opinion, everybody is legally and morally entitled to own guns. The u.s. constitution does delineate citizens' right to possess and carry arms -- a right that is often disregarded in the organizational context. In the year 2002, timberland owner and timber-products manufacturer, Weyerhaeuser, based in Seattle, sacked a number of its Oklahoma factory workers for violating the company-stipulated prohibition against keeping arms in their automobiles. This mass firing elicited a sharp outcry from gun-rights supporters such as the NRA (National Rifle Association). These groups assert that individuals bearing a firearms license must… Continue Reading...

Impact Of Federalism on Privacy Rights

2015, p.415). Actually, the right to privacy is a principle that is embedded in the architecture of the u.s. constitution, especially on the Bill of Rights. In light of recent security threats, the central government has enacted legislation that seemingly infringe on the right to privacy. Moreover, there have been numerous concerns on whether federalism interferes with this constitutional right. Despite these concerns, federalism has had positive impacts on citizens' right to privacy. One of the positive impacts of federalism on privacy rights is enabling people to decide the extent with which legislation affects their privacy. Federalism has achieved… Continue Reading...

Liberal and Conservative Beliefs Of Justices

establishing a court system at the creation of the u.s. constitution centered on the power struggle between states and the creation of a federal, central government with its own court and ability to overrule state court decisions. The Constitution pitted Federalists against Anti-Federalists. The former wanted a central government that acted as the top force over all the states; the latter wanted no central government -- because, after all, the Revolutionaries had just fought a war against a king -- why should they turn around and elect a new one? The idea of sovereign states was such that each… Continue Reading...

Indians Influence Founding Fathers

this document is the influence of Native Americans on the u.s. constitution. There is a fairly lengthy history of research that contends that Native Americans actually played a considerable role in the founding of the u.s. constitution. Moreover, there is also evidence that supports that certain members of the founding fathers were directly impacted by Native Americans. In fact, there are specific Native American tribes and political representations of these tribes that are alleged to have contributed to the u.s. constitution. A good amount of this evidence is considered in "Our Founding Mothers and Fathers, The Iroquois." There is… Continue Reading...

Illinois V Rodriguez Case

the state and granted a writ of certiorari (Samaha, 2012). Issue: The issue was whether the Fourth Amendment of the u.s. constitution prohibits warrantless search since police officers did not actually obtain valid consent from an individual who legally had common authority over the residence. Arguments or Objectives of the Parties: Rodriguez argued that the warrantless search violated the Fourth Amendment since Fischer had no authority to consent to the entry because she had left the apartment and was no longer living there several weeks before the occurrence of the incident. Rodriguez's objective was to suppress evidence that was seized… Continue Reading...

Self Incrimination and Right to Counsel Approach

When the right to remain silent was included in the Fifth Amendment of the u.s. constitution, it was tied to a complicated and controversial history. The Supreme Court has applied three tenets in the constitution to evolve rules that govern police interrogation and the confession process. These three include the Sixth Amendment on the Right to Counsel, the Fourteenth Amendment clause on due process and the Fifth Amendment on Self-incrimination clauses. Each of these provisions has led the police to handle interrogation and confessions in varying ways (Samaha, 2012). Although it is argued that the self-incrimination concept is rooted… Continue Reading...

Enactment Of the 19th Amendment Xix

and other like-minded activists did not favor the proposed 15th u.s. constitution Amendment[footnoteRef:7]. The amendment, if effected, would grant black men the right to participate in voting but would not give the same rights to any American women; irrespective of their skin color. Antony and Stanton created the national Women Suffrage Association commonly known as NWSA in 1869. They focused on a federal amendment of the constitution that would allow American women to vote. The American Women Suffrage Association was formed by the famous abolitionists: Lucy Stone and Henry Blackwell. The leaders were in favor of the 15th Amendment.… Continue Reading...

Supreme Court Second Amendment Case

this case is whether the provisions of the District of Columbia Code violate the Second Amendment to the u.s. constitution. In essence, the question is this case is, "Do the provisions of District of Columbia Code violate the Second Amendment through restricting handguns licensure and requiring trigger-locks for firearms kept in the home? Rule: The rule of law here is that the Second Amendment to the u.s. constitution gives individuals the right to bear arms. The amendment protects against violation of this right on the basis that a well regulated is crucial towards ensuring the security of a free… Continue Reading...

Philosophical Influences on the American Constitution

US constitution is a supreme law guiding the conducts of government, people, and organizations in the United States. The u.s. constitution comprises of seven articles that delineates the form of government. However, before the constitution came into force in 1789, there were philosophical thinking that influenced the compilation of the American constitution. The objective of this essay is to discuss the philosophical influences on the u.s. constitution. John Locke was an English Philosopher and his thinking had the great impact on the American constitution. John Locke believed that all people has alienated rights and they are created equal. John… Continue Reading...

The Right to Privacy

manifestation of the civil liberties which all citizens are assured of in the u.s. constitution. The preamble to the constitution states this fact. The preamble reveals the Constitution was created in part to “secure the Blessings of Liberty” (Founding Fathers). The blessings of liberty quickly become a curse if there is no privacy. If people were able to see and become cognizant of everything everyone did, then people are not necessarily free or experiencing a state of liberty. Privacy, therefore, is implicit to liberty, which is why the constitutional defense of this concept provides the foundation for the right… Continue Reading...

Improving Public Relations Between the Police Department and the Citizens

in a manner that could be considered to be contemptuous to the u.s. constitution or any other applicable law. Failure to address the numerous public complaints that have been leveled against the police department of this particular city could lead to the establishment of consent decrees against our police department by the Department of Justice. In an attempt to improve the relations between the police department and the citizens of this great city, I will be seeking to initiate far-reaching changes in a variety of areas including, but not limited to training and oversight. Various strategies will be adopted… Continue Reading...

Parkland School Shooting Essay

focused national attention on what can be done to stop this insane violence. When the Founding Fathers wrote the u.s. constitution and decided to add an enumerated a list of fundament rights for all Americans, they included the Second Amendment to guarantee that citizens could own firearms – but they also recognized the need for substantive restrictions on this right. Nevertheless, gun control opponents draw on the Second Amendment to the u.s. constitution to support their inalienable right to own guns noting that it specifically stipulates that “… the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall… Continue Reading...

2016 Presidential Election Essay

U.S. Presidential Election:  Crooked Versus Crazy? When the Founding Fathers wrote Article II of the u.s. constitution which stipulates that the president will be elected every 4 years, they also included specific criteria for eligibility including being born in the United States and being a minimum age of 35 years old. The Founders, though, likely did not foresee the day when the major candidates for the U.S. presidency were charged with so much political and psychological baggage or they might have reconsidered their eligibility requirements. The Democratic nominee, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, faces a wide array of… Continue Reading...

Miranda Vs. Arizona Case Brief Essay

arrested defendants of their constitutional rights against self-incrimination under the Fifth Amendment to the u.s. constitution before interrogation. Arguments or Objectives of the Parties: The defense counsel representing Ernesto Miranda objected the admission of the written confession into evidence on the basis that Miranda was not notified of his constitutional rights under the Fifth Amendment. This argument was based on the fact that police officers admitted that they did not advice Miranda of his right to an attorney and read out his right to voluntary confession prior to obtaining an oral confession from him.  Therefore, the objective of the… Continue Reading...

Freedom and Bondage Essay

the hard cold facts of slavery and bondage in the U.S.? The u.s. constitution is a document that fully embraces freedom. The word “slave” does not appear in the u.s. constitution, nor does “slavery.” The Framers of the Constitution “acknowledged that [blacks] were persons” (Jensen, 2008). However, there have been misunderstandings with reference to Article 1, Section 2, Clause 3 – the “Three-fifths Clause.” That clause was used by people who approved of slavery to suggest Africans / slaves were not “full persons” – but rather they were thought to be only 3/5ths of the value of white Americans. Slave… Continue Reading...

How to Become a U.s. Citizen Essay

in the Declaration of Independence? life and pursuit of happiness 2.  The Federalist Papers supported the passage of the u.s. constitution. Name one of the writers. Thomas Jefferson James Madison James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay wrote the Federalist Papers.  The u.s. constitution was written at the Constitutional Convention in 1787. People at the Constitutional Convention decided how the government should work. Then James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay wrote the Federalist Papers.  The Federalist Papers explained the new government. They said that the new United States needed the Constitution. Newspapers all over the United States published the Federalist Papers. 3.… Continue Reading...

How Native Americans Shaped Modern American Identity

ways that directly contributed to the contents of the u.s. constitution. Indeed, some authorities suggest that the Iroquois tribe provided Benjamin Franklin with the notion of a democratic republic for the burgeoning American colonies. For instance, Loewen reports that, “Indeed, Native American ideas may be responsible for our democratic institutions. In the 1740s the Iroquois wearied of dealing with several often bickering English colonies and suggested the colonies form a union similar to the [Iroquois] League” (103). Taken together, while the Native American tribes were poorly served by the United States, especially with Andrew Jackson’s notorious Indian Removal Act… Continue Reading...

Federalists and Anti Federalists on the Constitution

Project Title: Ratifying the u.s. constitution I chose this topic because I feel that our country went from being a loose union of individual states to being a nation with a central government when the Constitution was ratified. This was more important than the War for Independence, because it dictated the type of government we would have. The Federalists, led by Hamilton, wanted a strong central government. The Anti-Federalists wanted every state to be its own government. The guiding question for me is: Should the U.S. have ratified the Constitution or stayed a… Continue Reading...

Ratifying the U.s. Constitution

As Galles notes, the Anti-Federalists were opposed to the ratification of the u.s. constitution because they were worried it would lead to the same kind of tyrannical government the U.S. had just opposed in the Revolutionary War. Many of the Anti-Federalist supporters were farmers and people living in rural regions (U.S. History). They did not want a central government telling them what to do. Rather they wanted to keep government at the local level. That way they could have more control over their own lives without some group of people a thousand miles away in some other part of… Continue Reading...

The American Revolution and Enlightenment Thought

Revolution, Constitution and Enlightenment The American Revolution and the ensuing u.s. constitution put forward by the Federalists were both products of and directly informed by the European Enlightenment. The Founding Fathers were considerably influenced by thinkers like Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau and Montesquieu (whose separation of powers served as the model of the three-branched government of the U.S.). This paper will explain how the European Enlightenment set the stage for the American Revolution and u.s. constitution by putting out the ideas that the Americans would use as the basis of the political and social foundation. The Enlightenment aka… Continue Reading...

Ethics and Technology at Homeland Security

time, there are privacy rules and regulations that have to be considered as the Fourth Amendment of the u.s. constitution clearly gives people the right to privacy. Nonetheless, Homeland Security requires that the nation consider the evolution of terrorism and view it not just as an external threat but also as an internal threat. In other words, terrorism is not just a variable or factor that comes from outside the borders—it can also come from inside. Domestic terrorism or homegrown terrorism can result from the radicalization of members of society who are disgruntled, angry and in communication with radical… Continue Reading...

Racism in Birmingham Alabama

of the Civil War and the 13th Amendment to the u.s. constitution, which abolished slavery in America, equal rights for African Americans was one of the anticipated outcomes. Yet, the law did not swing entirely in favor of equality; rather, it offered freedom and segregation. Jim Crow laws were essentially institutionalized with the Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) decision, which affirmed that blacks were “separate but equal” to whites—i.e., they were “equal” in the eyes of the law (after all, the 14th Amendment had affirmed their equality, and the 15th had affirmed their right to vote—even women were not granted… Continue Reading...